The Origin of Capitalism

Honestly, but sadly, I had to tap out on this book for the time being. Time and time again, I’d pick up this book to read for a while, hang it up, like “Nope, can’t do it,” then return to trying to read it once more. This book is atrocious for me. Others who are more studious than me can hopefully get something from this one, though. I have highlights in this book here and there, but this book is a grudge for me.


The Origin of Capitalism seems to be as it is titled. The book’s description is what drew me. I found the book a good length of time ago on an app, I read its description, and I thought I saved it to read but didn’t. But, somehow, in my endeavor to write an upcoming title upon finances, I stumbled upon this book again. I recognized it from its cover and description, which says:


Capitalism is not a natural and inevitable consequence of human nature, nor is it simply an extension of age-old practices of trade and commerce. In this original and provocative book Ellen Meiksins Wood reminds us that capitalism is not a natural and inevitable consequence of human nature, nor is it simply an extension of age-old practices of trade and commerce. Rather, it is a late and localized product of very specific historical conditions, which required great transformations in social relations and in the human interaction with nature. This new edition is substantially revised and expanded, with extensive new material on imperialism, anti-Eurocentric history, capitalism and the nation-state, and the differences between capitalism and non-capitalist commerce. The author traces links between the origin of capitalism and contemporary conditions such as globalization, ecological degradation, and the current agricultural crisis.


The book seemed to me as a good read towards my endeavor, but the author wrote from the standpoint, “if you know, you know.” One has to be familiar with the content that’s presented to follow this book. It was like I needed to have taken the courses the author had taken, read the same books, and knew the same people to follow this book’s content to a degree. It was as if I was jumping in the middle of a conversation and was trying to follow along. I couldn’t do it. I’ve read other books on this topic at hand, but I could receive from them. This, on the other hand, I’m not in the know enough for this one.


If you’re studious enough, this might be the one for you. If any purchase and complete reading this book, fill me in on what it altogether communicates. If desirable, support local bookstores and get yours here: https://bookshop.org/a/56410/9781786630681



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